Sauteed Zucchini with Feta and Basil

Sauteed Zucchini with Feta and Basil

This is like ratatoulli without the eggplant- works good as a casserole if you want to throw it into a dish and top with the feta and breadcrumbs.

1/4 c olive oil
3 cloves garlic
2 large zucchini, chopped into 1/2-inch cubes
1/2 c black olives, chopped -nicoise or calamatas
2-3 Tbls chopped fresh basil
Crushed red pepper flakes (of course)
1/2 c chopped tomato- seeds removed
1/2 c crumbled feta

In sauté pan, heat the olive oil and sauté the garlic, add the zucchini and olives and cook on med high until soft. Add the tomatoes, cook 2-3 minutes until heated through. Season with salt, pepper and crushed red. Toss with crumbled feta and chopped oregano. Serve as is, or finish it in the oven at 350° until the breadcrumbs brown up a bit, 20–30 minutes.

Zucchini Frittata

Zucchini Frittata

A great Italian appetizer or brunch idea- this is as good cold as it is hot and very easy to prepare with any ingredients from the share.

2 Tbls olive oil
6-8 eggs- whisk with
1/4 c whole milk or half and half
1 med zucchini, sliced or jullienne (matchsticks)
2-3 small spring onions, sliced thin
1 med tomato, seeded and chopped- placed in a strainer to drain
2-3 Tbls chopped black olives
3-4 leaves basil,
rough chopped cheese- use goat cheese, fontina or mozz- preferably
chunks or thick slices
other options (ham, bacon or salami)

Preheat oven to 375° or use broiler. Use an 8-10-inch nonstick or well seasoned cast iron pan as this will finish in the oven, preferably under the broiler. Heat pan on med high heat and add olive oil, add onions and zucchini, saute until soft. Add tomatoes and olives, cook 1 minute, season veg with salt and pepper, pour in eggs, add basil, and cook 2-3 minutes on med, scraping and tilting the pan with a heat resistant rubber spatula, allowing the egg to run underneath each time, top with cheese. When eggs are still creamy, shake the pan and place under the broiler for 2-3 minutes until set- (without a broiler it may take 4-6 minutes in oven) remove from oven.

Allow to rest 5 minutes, then gently slide onto a platter- slice. I like to serve this with a freshly made aioli, or, garlic mayonnaise, which, made with Hogs Back eggs, is the best mayo you’ve eve had.

Tuscan Farro And Bean Soup

Tuscan Farro And Bean Soup

1 cup fresh borlotti or cranberry beans
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil plus additional for drizzling
1 large onion, coarsely chopped
2 carrots, coarsely chopped
1 celery rib, coarsely chopped
2 garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
8 cups water
1 large tomato (1/2 lb), coarsely chopped 1
/4 cup loosely packed fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
10 fresh sage leaves
3 sprigs fresh thyme
1 cup whole-grain farro, or spelt
2 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Shell beans and pick over. Heat oil in a 5- to 6-quart heavy pot over moderate heat until hot but not smoking, then cook onion, carrots, celery, and garlic, stirring occasionally, until onion is softened, about 10 minutes. Stir in water, beans, tomato, parsley, sage, and thyme and bring to a boil, then reduce heat and cook at a bare simmer, partially covered, stirring oc- casionally until beans are tender, about 1/2 hour.
Discard thyme sprigs, then blend mixture in batches in a blender until smooth (use caution when blending hot liquids), transferring to a large bowl. Return soup to pot and bring to a boil. Add farro and salt, then re- duce heat and simmer, stirring frequently, until farro is tender (it will be chewy like barley), about 30 minutes. Stir in pepper and serve drizzled with additional oil.

Salsa de Jitomate (Cocida) Cooked Tomato Sauce

I wanted to share a recipe we enjoy from one of Diana Kennedy’s cookbooks. If you’re not familiar with her she is to Mexican cooking what Julia Childs was to French cooking. She treats tomatoes and peppers dif- ferently in some recipes. In the following recipe she roasts the tomatoes and toasts the chiles. To roast the tomatoes place them whole (don’t core them) in a foil-lined pan under a medium-high broiler. You want them to cook through which should take about 20 minutes, so put them far enough away from the heat that they don’t burn up right away. It’s o.k. if the skins get good and black. For toasting the chiles she suggests putting them on a comal, which is a mexican earthenware heating plate placed over a fire. I use a cast-iron griddle on the stovetop. Any heavy saute pan should work. Put the pan on medium-high heat and toast the chiles in the dry pan, turning them frequently until they’re blistered and softened.

Salsa de Jitomate (Cocida) Cooked Tomato Sauce

3 medium tomatoes, roasted
3 chiles serranos, toasted
1/4 onion, roughly chopped
1 small clove garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
2 Tbs. safflower oil
1/4 tsp. salt, or to taste

Blend the tomatoes, peppers, onions and garlic to a fairly smooth sauce, it should have some texture. Leave the core and seeds in the tomatoes, they add extra body to the sauce. You may seed the serranos if you’d prefer a milder, but still hot sauce.

Heat the oil in a small frying pan, add the sauce and salt and cook over a medium flame for about 5 minutes until it has thickened and is well seasoned.

Use this sauce as an alternative to fresh salsas or as a enchilada or taco sauce. I like to add a little vinegar to mine since good fresh tomatoes tend to make it a little sweet for me.