Speedy Sautéed Hakurei Turnips and Greens

Speedy Sautéed Hakurei Turnips and Greens

1 bunch hakurei turnips with greens
1/2 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 tablespoon butter
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons white wine

Rinse the turnips and greens well. Cut the greens from the turnips and chop into 2-inch pieces. Trim any straggly roots from the turnips and discard. Cut the turnips into quarters or eighths, depending on size.

In a sauté pan with a lid, heat the olive oil and butter. Add the turnips, sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper, and sauté until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes . Remove the turnips from the pan. Add the greens to the pan, along with any moisture still clinging to the leaves. Cover the pan and allow the greens to cook, stirring once or twice, until just tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Add the white wine and cook until almost all the liquid is gone. Return the turnips to the pan; cook 1 to 2 minutes to heat through. Serve immediately.

Collard Ribbons with Sesame

Collard ribbons with Sesame

1 large bunch collards, stems removed, washed and cut into 1/4-inch strips, stack 5 or 6 leaves at a time to make this easier.
2 cups water
1 tablespoon molasses
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon peanut or safflower oil
2 teaspoons Asian sesame oil
1/4 teaspoon chili flakes
1 garlic clove minced
2 teaspoons sherry or cider vinegar
1 1/2 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds

Combine collards in a very wide deep skillet with water, molasses, salt and oils. Bring to a boil, twisting greens with tongs or turning with spatula until wilted. Cover and boil until collards are tender but still chewy, about 15 minutes.

Uncover and add chili flakes and garlic. Raise heat and boil, stirring often, until liquid has evaporated, about 5 minutes. Add vinegar gradually to taste, sprinkle with sesame seeds and serve.

Collard Ribbons with Sesame

Collard Ribbons with Sesame

1 bunch collard greens
1 cup water
1/2 Tbs molasses
1/4 salt
1/2 Tbs peanut oil
1 tsp dark sesame oil
1 garlic clove
1 tsp cider vinegar
1 Tbs toasted sesame seeds
Chili flakes to taste

Strip stems from collard leaves and discard. Rinse leaves in several changes of water. Stack leaves 5 or 6 at a time and halve lengthwise, then cut across into 1/4-inch strips (to make about 5 packed cups)
Combine collards in very wide deep skillet with water, molasses, salt and peanut and sesame oils. Bring to a boil, twisting greens with tongs or turning with spatula until wilted. Cover and boil until collards are tender but still chewy–about 15 minutes.

Uncover and add chili flakes and garlic. Raise heat and boil, stirring often, until liquid has evaporated, about 5 minutes. Season, adding vinegar gradually. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and serve hot.

Citrus Collards with Raisins

Citrus Collards with Raisins

1 large bunch collard greens
Coarse sea salt
1/2 t. olive oil
1 garlic clove, minced
1/2 c. raisins
2 medium oranges

Remove the stems from the collards and discard. Stack four or five leaves on top of one another. Roll the leaves into a tight cylinder. Slice crosswise, cutting the leaves into thin strips. Rinse the leaves in cold water and drain in a colander.

In a large pot over high heat, bring 3 quarts water to a boil and add 3 teaspoons salt. Add the collards and cook, uncovered for 10 minutes. Remove, drain and plunge into a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking and set the color of the greens. Drain.

In a medium sauté pan, over medium heat, warm the oil. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute. Add the collards, raisins and a pinch of salt. Saute for 3 minutes, stirring frequently. Section the oranges, reserving the juice. Add the oranges and juice and cook for an additional 30 seconds. Do not overcook (collards should be bright green). Serve immediately.

Collard Greens Miniera

Collard Greens Miniera

  • 1 bunch collard greens, halved lengthwise and stems and center ribs discarded
  • 3 slices good quality bacon, finely chopped

Stack collard-leaf halves and roll crosswise into a cigar shape. Cut crosswise into very thin slices (no thicker than 3/4 inch) with a sharp knife. This is a French preparation called chiffonade, which literally means made of rags, and is a great way to slice up any green because you can make it very uniform and any size.Cook bacon in a 12-inch nonstick skillet over moderate heat, stirring, until crisp. Add collards, tossing to coat, and cook until just bright green, about 1 minute. Season with salt and serve immediately. You could also add some toasted nuts and a squeeze of lemon or lime. Vegetarians could substitute olive oil for the bacon.

Braised Greens

Braised Greens

1 bunch collards or kale, coarse stems removed
1 onion, diced
1 clove garlic, thinly sliced
½ t. red pepper flakes
¼ c. butter
Salt

Plunge the greens into a large pot of boiling salted water, cook them for 10 minutes, then remove to a bowl. Reserve ½ cup of the cooking water. Melt the butter in a wide skillet over medium heat until it starts to turn golden brown and smell a bit nutty. Add the onion, garlic and pepper flakes and stir occasionally until the garlic is light brown and the onion soft. Add the greens, reserved cooking water and 1 teaspoon salt. Cook for 30 minutes and taste again for salt, they can take a lot. Serve with a dash of Tabasco.

Collards

Collards

Here’s a tasty collard recipe…

2 bunches collards, remove stems and chop
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 1 inch piece of ginger, finely chopped
1 small tomato, chopped
2 med-large onions, chopped
olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Cover a cast iron skillet with enough oil to coat the bottom well. Set on medium high heat. Add the onion and cook until light brown (6-8 minutes). Add the garlic, ginger, and tomato. Saute for a minute or two. Add 2 cups of water, and the collards. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer until the water is gone, stirring occasionally (about 1 hour). Salt and pepper to taste. I would also add a chunk of bacon or a smoked ham hock at the same time as the onions.